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Probably as good a day as any to post these…

I started a new project earlier this year when I was in a bit of a rut with regards to my own photography. While on holiday in Scotland for a couple of weeks I decided to stop looking for the same old things I normally look for and to shoot whatever the hell I wanted; that may sound like the most obvious thing in the world to do, but it’s sometimes easy to forget. I don’t know where it will go, to be honest, but if you like these you can see more of the first batch here.

shanolyno:

Ahead of tomorrow’s referendum, here are some of Raymond Depardon’s Scotland photos from the 1980. This work was shown for the first time as part of Un moment si doux at the Grand Palais in November.

➜ matthewsmolinsky.com | Welcome
➜ Q&A:BURK-UZZLE

theheavycollective:


image


It is helpful to once in a while stir the stew.

Navigating the road between maintaining personal freedom and earning a crust can be a rocky one. Sit in one place too long and stagnate or cut loose until the cash runs out. Armed with a restless spirit perhaps…

Cairngorms, Scotland, 2014

Cairngorms, Scotland, 2014

mpdrolet:

Asbury view from hotel, 1980
Joe Maloney

mpdrolet:

Asbury view from hotel, 1980

Joe Maloney

mpdrolet:

New Haven, Ct., 2014
Jim Goldberg

mpdrolet:

New Haven, Ct., 2014

Jim Goldberg

Spent some time looking through Don Hudson’s archives for the umpteenth time this morning. What an incredible photographer he is.

1. Detroit, MI 1982
2. Hamtramck, MI 1981
3. Philadelphia, PA 1976
4. South Lyon, MI 1979
5. Detroit, MI 1984

badwires:

David Guttenfelder - Inside the Cult of Kim 2

badwires:

David Guttenfelder - Inside the Cult of Kim 2

➜ Paul Russell: street photography instruction/inspiration

The only advice you’ll ever need.

greatleapsideways:

"It’s shocking to think of how much in current Western experience is ruled out by Koudelka, and nullified as if it never existed. One could search practically in vain for the historical Europe or the tourist scene, the life of the middle classes, plastics, the consumer market, signs, cars, modern diversions, blue-collar existence, productive systems of any kind, in short the characteristic jamboree of the late twentieth century. It takes a certain exclusionary genius to have rejected such sights while still asserting one’s ties to people. A great deal has been made of the solitary spirit of Koudelka’s work, but that spirit protests too much. Because of his rhetorical estrangement, his world may be as inhospitable as it is unfamiliar, but it remains a world of minority cultures, whose religious and funerary rituals it intimately discloses. (…) What happens in his pictures seems to have taken place a long time ago, under archaic conditions, hard to remember… so that their actual contemporaneity appears misplaced."

— Max Kozloff “Koudelka’s Theater of Exile” (1988) in Lone Visions, Crowded Frames: Essays on Photography 

mpdrolet:

Joe Johnson
Paul TrevorLolesworth Street, E1, London (1978)

Paul Trevor
Lolesworth Street, E1, London (1978)

➜ The Loose Documentary of Andy Kochanowski

'I’ll tell you what, I still like a good gag shot and so do the punters. My fire hose-in-the-eye guy got something like 1,800 favorites on Flickr before I disabled public viewing. Yeah I know it’s not really cool to have a funny shot, but people who say that usually don’t have one in their portfolio, you know?'

Good read.

THEME BY PARTI